LINCS Blog
LINCS timeline view in ResearchSpace

— Evan Rees, LINCS UX co-op — The road to UX for me has been long and winding, and I, much like the LINCS users in the Tube Map in Figma, have found myself at various stations along the way, assessing where I should go next. Initially studying Life Sciences at University of Toronto, I made […]

Digging into DH

  • LINCS Project
  • December 10, 2021

How working for a DH project has broadened my academic interests and comfort zone — Hannah Stewart, LINCS undergraduate research assistant — I joined the LINCS Project as an undergraduate research assistant, mainly to work on the Orlando Project. This position gave me my first real experience with Digital Humanities (DH). Before starting the job I could barely […]

Flowchart diagram showing the DoReMus model for improvised performance, including the distinct Performed Expression class

— Sam Peacock, LINCS undergraduate research assistant — When I began working with ontologies at the LINCS project this summer, my colleagues and I quickly found ourselves asking exasperating questions like “How do you explain the visual concepts present in an artwork to a database?” Even more broad (and maybe ultimately unanswerable) questions like “what is […]

Colourful painting with leave and floral elements

— Sarah Mousseau, LINCS undergraduate research assistant — In the summer of 2020, I was hired as a research assistant with the University of Guelph’s Bachinski/Chu Print Study Collection. Initially, my job entailed the care and maintenance of the objects in the collection with a few other tasks as assigned. Of course, the arrival of the […]

Collaboration in Times of Social Isolation

  • LINCS Project
  • December 16, 2020
ISTOCKPHOTO.COM/ANARII KALENSKYI

— Thomas Smith, LINCS undergraduate research assistant — To avoid the COVID-19 outbreak, I moved back home from Guelph to the town of Bowmanville, a community with a population of around 40,000 people. My family sold our home of twenty years just before the pandemic, buying a quaint little house in Minden, Ontario, a town […]

— Kathleen McCulloch-Cop, LINCS co-op student — Pop psychology has a concept most of us are familiar with: the linear, calculating left brain vs. the intuitive, creative right brain. The theory is that you either use one or the other, you’re either left-brained dominant or you’re right-brained dominant, but you can’t be both. This myth […]

Why LINCS?

  • Susan Brown
  • August 11, 2020

The core of the Linked Infrastructure for Networked Cultural Scholarship project is the simple proposition that making Linked Open Data out of the stuff scholars use to understand and analyze culture will make a difference. LINCS hopes to make a difference to how we can make sense of the human past and present. It aims […]