Linked Infrastructure for Networked Cultural Scholarship

LINCS will create the conditions to think differently, with machines, about culture in Canada. Human brains work through a vast web of interconnections, but the web that researchers increasingly use to understand culture and history has few meaningful links. LINCS will convert and interlink Canadian research datasets on cultural identities and cultural heritage, making them accessible as Linked Open Data for the benefit of scholars and the public.

LINCS serves Canadian researchers by interweaving data from fields including history, communication, music, performance, and literary studies to transform how we engage with culture online.

LINCS will enable deep contextualization and new ways of understanding, empowering researchers and the public with the means to engage more effectively with a vast array of digital cultural content.

LINCS collaborates with stewards of cultural data collections and development partners committed to exploring the potential of Linked Open Data to contribute to a better open knowledge ecology.

LINCS benefits from and contributes to Canada’s national network of expertise in research software development, research computing infrastructure, and research data management.

Linked Open Data for Canadian Cultural Research

Human brains work through a vast web of interconnections, but the web that researchers increasingly use to understand human culture and history has few meaningful links. Linked Infrastructure for Networked Cultural Scholarship will create the conditions to think differently, with machines, about human culture in Canada.

What

The LINCS infrastructure project will convert large datasets into an organized, interconnected, machine-processable set of resources for Canadian cultural research.

Why

LINCS aims to provide context for the cultural material that currently floats around online, interlink it, ground it in its sources, and help to make the World Wide Web a trusted resource for scholarly knowledge production.

Who

With a team of technical and domain experts, LINCS will allow Canadian scholars and partner institutions to play a significant role in the developing the Semantic Web.

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Why LINCS?

The core of the Linked Infrastructure for Networked Cultural Scholarship project is the simple proposition that making Linked Open Data out of the stuff scholars use to understand and analyze culture will make a difference. LINCS hopes to make a difference to how we can make sense of the human past and present. It aims […]

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